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Journal doodles: 17 Things To Do In 2017 😊

 

Seventeen is my number of choice this year; 17 things I would like to try out, conquer, experience, encounter and experience in 2017. The start of a new year always conjures up excitement for me, a chance to reflect on the year just passed and to dream up adventures for the 12 months ahead, so for the first week of January I crack open a new fresh journal and start doodling!

I sketch, list, bullet point, free write - a few hours spent doodling a word splat of all the things buzzing in my mind. Often my new year resolutions involve practical challenges - a marathon to train for, 100 mile bike ride or muddy race somewhere; this year I wanted to balance the physical with everyday things I would enjoy, so learning to cook new yummy veggie dishes, to get my paint brushes out again and read more regularly are in my 17.

Learning to longboard, turn more confidently when surfing, participate in a SUP race and to complete my own version of an Ironman triathlon by traveling around the coast of Wales or Scotland are also on my list of ’17 Things To Do in 2017’.  

 

Yestival 2016 was such an inspiring weekend – I left with hundreds of ideas, feeling positive and raring to take on an adventure! After a few months of mulling my Yestival experience I finally feel ready to take on 2017 with an awesome adventure: this year, one of my 17 pledges is to travel 70 miles every month. Come join me!  

Last year was certainly a year of extremes – I lost my dad at the start of the year, had health related concerns, a relationship break up and more stress than I'd ever experienced, the exciting development of my business – opening the 4Motion Studio, received our first large funding, became a Mentor and met my adorable new nephew at Christmas. I also completed my Giving It Back Volunteering Project, a 5-week 1,245 mile adventure around the coast of England swimming, cycling, running, SUP’in and volunteering in retirement homes, a donkey sanctuary and schools.

Woo - what a year!

Reflecting on everything that happened last year, I gave a lot of thought to what's important to me, and what I want to achieve and experience this year. I really enjoy the process of transforming my dreams and ambitions into words and action, so I picked up my journal and started doodling!

After attending Yestival in October and feeling utterly inspired by everyone I met, with further inspiration gleaned from the Yes Tribe Facebook page and Tough Girl stories I want to take everything I've learned and truly embrace all the things I love doing whilst still learning, being mindful and making time for family, friends and myself.

My dad would have been 70 this year, so to celebrate his love of being active and outdoors (usually on a cricket pitch!!) I am going to raise money for Parkinson UK and Ataxia by moving 70 miles every month of 2017. This will be by unmotorised travel: either running, walking, swimming, cycling, SUP paddling or even dancing (not sure yoga sun salutations would clock up the miles?!!).

Although of course my dad’s passing was extremely sad and a complete shock, I choose to take a positive attitude and flip my sadness into something meaningful, to carry his life forward by getting out there and making the most of every living breathing moment. That’s why I’ve devised #70mileseverymonth4dads70th and I’d love you all to join me!  

Don't wait for a loved one to pass or feel ill: grab life by the hands now, fuel it with energy and freakin get out there to make something happen!!

I've got a few events lined up (Coast to Coast of Scotland, a few triathlons, ultra marathons) and I'll be on the road this summer exploring the coast in either Wales, Scotland or Ireland on a mission to give it back (Giving It Back - www.giving-it-back.com), so if you want to join me, or fancy a 70 mile moving buddy - hola!

Let's make 2017 great - let's choose happiness, let’s choose our health, let's choose life.

Elaine

 

FB: @Givingitback / @Elainemacey

Insta: giving_itback / elaine_dancingyogi

Website: www.giving-it-back.com

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Tribe Stories Round Up - January 10 2017

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Tribe Stories Round Up - January 10 2017

A weekly (most of the time) round up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

Researched and written by Richard Potter.


STEPHEN BRASSETT - THE LONGEST WALK NZ

Do you care about animal welfare? Stephen Brassett certainly does! On the 7th of January he began walking over 4,500km around New Zealand to raise money for animal welfare organisations, raise awareness about the issues these organisations face and generally improve animal welfare in New Zealand. 

Stephen started in Invercargill and his route will take him up the South Island, to the top of the North Island and then back down to Wellington for the finish. He's reached Gore already even though the floor of the micro camper he's pulling behind him was torn out during a transit accident. We're wishing him well and looking forward to further updates about his journey!

You can follow the progress on Facebook or on this website and you can make a donation at this site.


WASSAILING! SOUTH EAST YESTRIBE MEETUP

On the 27th of January YesTribers will be attending The Wassail, a ceremony that ensures lasting health of the orchard. Its a merry night of noise, fire, food, drink, poetry and songs! If you'd like to join them just head to Hasslemere train station by 5:30pm on the 27th. 

Full details are available on the Facebook event page.

Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We'd love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn't need to be an endurance adventure: many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community.


We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers. 

 

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

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The Wildest Journey

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The Wildest Journey

Last year Chaz Powell walked further along the Zambezi river in one journey than anyone else in recorded history. He will be returning to Zambia in March 2017 to finish the final stretch. Until then he will be undertaking mini adventures in the UK and abroad to raise more funds for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation. If you'd like to join him on one of the mini adventures, contact him through his website. Details are at the end of the post.

In 2016 I took up the biggest challenge of my life and walked from the source of Africa's wildest river, the mighty Zambezi, through Zambia all the way to the Mozambique border. At this point, I was forced to end my epic walk due to security issues in Mozambique.

The explorer beard coming on nicely after 3 months along the Zambezi. Credit: Alex Frood

The explorer beard coming on nicely after 3 months along the Zambezi. Credit: Alex Frood

Yet it was still what I would describe as an epic journey! I walked more than 2000 km over 97 days in blistering temperatures that reached 50°C some days. The remote, inhospitable areas I encountered are not usually visited by westerners, so most people I met were nomadic tribes who were at first very suspicious and wary of my presence. However after tense explanations they treated me as their guest with great kindness and hospitality, offering me food and a place to stay.

The dry and dusty paths that run along the Zambezi’s bank. Where temperatures can often reach 50°C. Credit: Alex Frood

The dry and dusty paths that run along the Zambezi’s bank. Where temperatures can often reach 50°C. Credit: Alex Frood

I often walked for up to 12 hours in a day, covering as much as 50km. At night I slept in villages or camped near the Zambezi. The river runs through some of the remotest and wildest places on the planet, the kind of environments I was really not accustomed to. I was accused of witchcraft, diamond smuggling, being a ghost, being Jesus Christ and even a reincarnation of the great Scottish explorer Livingstone!

I crossed the Barotse floodplains where I waded waste-deep through a maze of swamps. I walked through the deep sided Zambezi gorges without seeing people for days on end; I almost lost my life when I moved away from the river and became seriously lost and dehydrated.

   Crossing the many tributaries along the Zambezi was often like navigating a maze of swamps. Credit: Alex Frood

 

Crossing the many tributaries along the Zambezi was often like navigating a maze of swamps. Credit: Alex Frood

But eventually – between 10th August - November 17th 2016 - I reached Mozambique, which means I have walked further along the Zambezi river in one journey than anyone else in recorded history.

Why?

I wanted to undertake a wild journey in a wild place, and explore parts of the world that few westerners venture into, to discover how people are living in these remote areas. Also taking on this challenge is enabling me to raise awareness about the devastating loss of wildlife that is happening along the Zambezi and throughout the rest of the world due to poaching. I hope to find a way to work with local people to help protect the wildlife that remains.

My highlights

I enjoyed spending time with villagers, whose hospitality and humbleness frequently overwhelmed me. I loved visiting local schools and seeing their shocked and excited expressions when I recounted the tales of my adventures along the Zambezi. Talking with them made me feel a huge sense of purpose, helped me fully embrace the incredible and unique journey and gave me the motivation to continue when I was mentally and physically stretched to my limits.

Only towards the end of my journey did I realise the deadly Tetse fly was attracted to my blue bag. I always wondered why my bag was covered in so many flys. Credit: Alex Frood

Only towards the end of my journey did I realise the deadly Tetse fly was attracted to my blue bag. I always wondered why my bag was covered in so many flys. Credit: Alex Frood

Top three lessons learned

To be patient and respect how different people live and their traditions.

To live without the need for modern comforts and to appreciate the little and special things in life.

That I have a lot of self belief and determination, and that a human being can do anything they truly put their mind to.

My expedition was self-funded. To date I have raised £1000 for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, which is working towards fighting the war against poachers, setting up and establishing more nature reserves for wildlife and educating young people about the importance of protecting wildlife for future generations.

Plans for this year

In March I fly back to Zambia and pick up my Zambezi walk where I was previously forced to finish. I will walk the final 600km to the Indian Ocean, where the challenge – to walk the length of the Zambezi river – will be completed.

Until I set off in July, I will continue to raise vital funds for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation by taking on mini challenges here in the UK and abroad. In February I fly to Romania for a few days to do some winter hiking in the Carpathian Mountains. I am also planning a source-to-sea trek along the River Thames, and am hoping to trek across the Cairngorms, a mountain range in the eastern Highlands of Scotland.

All donations warmly received!

 www.justgiving.com/WalkingTheZambezi 

To find out more:

Twitter: @WalkTheZambezi

Facebook: The Wildest Journey

www.thewildestjourney.com

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Tribe Stories Round Up - January 3 2017

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Tribe Stories Round Up - January 3 2017

A weekly (most of the time) round-up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

Researched and written by Richard Potter.


48 PEAKS LATER

In November 2015 Michelle Ellison, Tom Hook and Andy Grant began a challenge to climb the highest peak in every country in Europe.  The list (available here) ranges from Mount Elbrus in Russia (5462 metres) to St Peter’s Dome in Vatican City (132 metres).  They’ve scaled 18 so far and have 30 to go.  Next on the list is Monte Titano in San Marino, which they’ll be tacking later this month.

When they complete their challenge (the finish is scheduled for October 2017) they’ll have climbed an epic 87,704 metres with the support of The Outward Bound Trust. If you’d like to make a donation to the Trust please visit this site.

For more information about 48 peaks later and to follow the team’s progress, check out their website. They’d like as many people as possible to join them on the climbs so feel free to get in touch with them if you’re interested! In particular, they’re looking to have 45 people join them for the final climb, Snowdon, so that 48 people will climb the 48th peak.


TARA PAPWORTH - CYCLING 1200 KM THROUGH PATAGONIA

To start off 2017 with a bang, Tara Papworth made the 1st of January the start of a 1200km cycling trip down the Carretera Austral in Chile.  The airline lost her baggage but this hasn’t stopped her adventure: we look forward to seeing further updates on her Facebook page. Go Tara!


RAMBLE AND A ROAST

If you're based near Bristol (or will be in the area on the 8th of January) and you fancy meeting some fellow YesTribers, then come along for a 6 mile walk (taking in Blaise Castle and Kings Weston) followed by roast dinner in a local pub.

The meeting point will be in Shirehampton at 11AM on the 8th: full details are yet to be confirmed but will be listed on the Facebook event page.

 

Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We’d love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn’t need to be an endurance adventure, many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community.


We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers. 

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

 

 

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A 400 mile walk and kayaking adventure that’s changed my life

In June earlier this year, I completed a 400 mile adventure, “Walk for Aoife”. The walk took me from Manchester, where I live to Dingle, Ireland, where I grew up. Oh, and it was actually more than a walk since it also included kayaking 60 miles across the formidable Irish Sea, which took me almost a day.

The whole adventure took 29 days and I raised £21K for mental health and disability charities.

I took this challenge on from my own, completely inexperienced perspective - an ordinary guy wanting to do something extraordinary. I’d never walked any distance before in my life, and I only learned to swim last year. When I got into the kayak at Holyhead (see this clip of me starting out) to cross the Irish Sea, it was only the third time I’d been in a kayak!

I pushed through blisters, torn ligaments and a stress fracture on my foot, none of which could stop me from completing the journey and in the end I finished a day ahead of schedule.

Why did I do it?

I lost my sister Aoife in 2011. She was severely disabled, suffering from cerebral palsy all her life which meant she could not walk, talk or communicate. I undertook the challenge in her name as I wanted my relationship with her to be my focus and inspiration; and the challenge i saw asthe resolution of that relationship.

A few years ago I read “A Walk to London” by William Mcgillivray, a little known book by the Scottish ornithologist and bird artist. This planted the seed of an idea for a long distance walking challenge. I also knew I wanted to fundraise for charities that would help people in Manchester and Dingle.

While I was lucky (and still am) to have an amazingly supportive wife and daughter, I came to realise that I had always felt a little dissatisfied with what I was doing with my life. I felt like something was missing. So I worked with a life coach to identify what I wanted to focus on outside my job and family life.

Saying Yes

These Whys all came together to help me say “Yes, I can do this”! On Aoife’s birthday (November 12th 2015) I revealed to friends and family what I planned to do. Making it public ensured I was going to see it through and made me feel a huge sense of freedom because it helped me feel more responsible for the outcome, and to feel motivated to live up to my word. I used to be really bothered about what other people thought of me so I used this to tap into that fear in order to turn it into fuel! I found this way of finding motivation to be very effective.

During the challenge itself, it was remembering these Whys, together with my sheer determination and the memory of my sister Aoife, that kept me motivated.

After the challenge

The changes that have happened in my life since the challenge have been as enlightening and life changing as the challenge itself.

I learnt there is healing to be found within pain, and that pain is not something to be afraid of. We all experience pain at some point in our lives, and it’s better to experience it rather than run away from it because ultimately, we can and will handle it. This is true for both emotional and physical pain.

I have learned to let go of the past and when I’m scared, to confront fear head on and  push through it by having more belief in myself and saying Yes to life.

Since I completed the walk I have been giving public talks about the challenge, to a broad spectrum of people – always with the aim to encourage them to identify their life goals, to see past fear and pain, and to believe they can do something they might never have thought possible.

The walk has led to other new challenges for me: I am now working on the second draft of my book about the challenge and hoping to have it published next year. I am about to begin training as a guide, taking people into the wilderness to find space in which to disconnect from the stresses of daily life and relax by connecting with nature. I am also writing more and making more time for regular reflection and to spend with my family.

I have developed a different attitude to overcoming obstacles – I now see them as just things to get through! I endured such physical and mental pain over the 29 days and pushed through it. Nothing can ever be as bad as that!

 Advice

If you’re thinking of fundraising, I recommend setting a big target – mine was £50K.I knew that if I set myself a huge target I would probably do some crazy things to fundraise. I haven’t hit that target yet, but it certainly encouraged me to ‘aim high’.

Also, it is ok to not have all the answers immediately. The idea for the journey evolved over several months – I knew I wanted to get from Manchester to Dingle, and that I wanted to walk wherever possible, but the rest I made up along the way. There was no path or track for my walk. It wasn't the Camino, it was my personal pilgrimage - from my front door to my parents' house - and it was totally unique and had to be built from scratch. I gave it space to evolve until I was at a point with the idea where I could fully commit – and say YES!

If you want to read more…..

My blog details the challenge: www.walkforaoife.com

If you would care to donate: https://www.justgiving.com/teams/Walk-for-Aoife

8 hours into the Irish sea crossing with Mike Alexander. Wales somewhere in the background!
On the Grand canal in Offaly, the centre of Ireland
First glimpse of the Atlantic at Foynes, 5 days from the finish.

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Tribe Stories Round Up - December 19 2016

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Tribe Stories Round Up - December 19 2016

A weekly (most of the time!) round-up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

 

Researched and written by Richard Potter.


ADAM CONLON - RUNNING FROM BATH TO BELFAST

To end 2016 on a high note, Adam Conlon is on a 315 km run from Bath to Belfast. He set off on the 15th of December to raise money for Walking with the Wounded's Walking Home for Xmas Campaign. Go Adam!

You can follow his progress on Facebook and you can also visit his fundraising page.


LITTLE PADDLE'S CHRISTMAS PADDLE

Little Paddle was created by Andy McLean and Nick Miller following on from the Quapaw 24 Big Paddle in April 2016.

Little's Paddle's 8th outing, held over the weekend of 10 and 11 December, was their Christmas special and first venture outside of England. The team met up in Monmouth and paddled the River Wye.  

Over the year Little Paddle has gone to the Cotswolds, Kent, Shepperton (home of the Yes Bus), Bath, Windsor, Bedford, The Peak District and finally to Wales. A typical outing consists of paddling on Saturday, a camp out and more paddling on Sunday. 

However, of late (with the weather getting colder) the team has taken to indoor accommodation including Mount Cook Adventure Centre and has also embraced walking. They've even tried to break the Guinness Record for "Most People in a Telephone Box".

The next Little Paddle outing will be in January in Essex. Please contact Paul Balson if you'd like to come along. Everyone is welcome: Ollie Hull, who is only 7, has come on four Little Paddle outings already.

Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We’d love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn’t need to be an endurance adventure, many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community.


We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers.

 

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

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Tribe Stories Round Up - December 13 2016

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Tribe Stories Round Up - December 13 2016

A weekly (most of the time!) round-up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

 

Researched and written by Richard Potter.


WILL COPELAND - COLDEST CORBETT

Do you fancy hiking up a mountain in Scotland? Since the 1st of November Will Copestake has been on a mission to climb 222 Corbetts in a single winter season and he’d like YOU to join him for a summit or two.  You can find more information, including his contact details, on this website or by searching for #coldestcorbett on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.


ANNE-LAURE CARRUTH - A PEEK INSIDE

From November 2015 to November 2016 Anne-laure Carruth made a visual diary of her mind by painting one picture every day. The project, A Peek Inside, is a wonderful kaleidoscope capturing all the promise which the world can offer and the fragility that comes with trying to bring our dreams to life.

You can find out more about A Peek Inside here.


CHRIS ANDREWS - LET'S GET AMERICA TALKING

Chris Andrews is taking walking and talking to a whole new level. On the 8th of August he began a 3,000 mile journey on foot across the U.S.A. to celebrate face-to-face conversation in a digital age and encourage shifts in the way we think about communication.

Chris is currently 127 days into his journey: if you’d like to follow his progress, or maybe even catch up with him for a face-to-face chat, please visit his website or his Facebook page.


Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We’d love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn’t need to be an endurance adventure, many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community.

We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers.

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

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Yes Tribe Story - Graham Carter

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Yes Tribe Story - Graham Carter

If I can run 100 miles, anyone can!

My running journey started in 2005, when I entered a 10 mile race to raise money for cancer research after a friend died of the disease aged 34. I was unfit, had never run further than 3 miles and didn’t know if I could run 10 miles in one go!

But after 6 months of training I managed to complete the 10 mile race. Little did I know when I crossed the finish line and pledged never, ever to run that far again (!) that, 10 years later, I’d be lining up to run a 100 mile race and that would be the 6th ultra marathon I’d run. 

So how did I end up running these crazy distances?!

I ran my first marathon, the London Marathon, in 2012 and really struggled. Afterwards, I wondered if I was cut out for running long distance races. Then I found out about ultra marathons from a friend, who had run the North Downs Way 50 mile ultra marathon. He told me that if I could run a marathon, then I could run 50 miles. Ultra marathons are races longer than marathon distance, typically 50km (31 miles) and above.

I really wasn’t sure whether to believe him. But there was only one way to find out – and it is this curiosity that spurred my YES moment – so I signed up for the North Downs Way 50 the following year. 

The month before that race I volunteered in one of the aid stations of a 50 mile race – these are stops on the race route where runners can top up their water, grab some food and receive encouragement from the volunteers. I got to experience the runners’ struggles and determination first hand. I was, and continue to be every time I volunteer (at 8 separate ultra marathon races to date), inspired by each and every runner. The sense of community in the ultra marathon racing scene is truly amazing, and every runner is made to feel special and included by the volunteers - and the runners, in turn, show so much appreciation for the help, guidance and encouragement provided by the race volunteers.  

After my first 50 mile race fellow runners predicted that I would sign up for a 100 mile race. I said never! Yet I had another YES moment, curiosity once again getting the better of me – so afew months later I signed up to run the South Downs Way 100 mile race in 2015. I never doubted that I would finish that race, having trained well. 

This year, however, I suffered a number of injury setbacks and my second 100 mile race, the Autumn 100, didn’t go to plan but I still managed to complete it.  

“Do the thing you think you cannot do.” Eleanor Roosevelt

I am not a natural sportsman. I was borderline asthmatic at school and always last to be picked in team events. Yet I achieved something I previously thought impossible. I didn’t give up, kept moving forward, and managed to achieve something truly special. 

Running ultra marathons has made me a calmer, more resilient and positive person. Knowing that I have overcome some very difficult mental and physical challenges during races has helped me to be more level headed in stressful situations, such as during busy periods at work.  

Every time I run a race, whatever the distance, the same thoughts go through my head:  “I can’t do this.” “I think I can do this.” “I can do this.” “Why am I doing this?” “I am going to do this.” “I did it.” “Never again!” 

Then, race completed, with endorphins buzzing, I find myself planning the next race....

Even now, it seems strange to think that I have run 100 miles in one go. Twice. We can all achieve so much more than we think we are capable of, and I would encourage anyone thinking of doing an ultra marathon to go for it. 

To complete an ultra marathon you need to run regularly (but not crazy distances, as I generally run anything from 25-40 miles a week) but maintaining a positive attitude and believing you can do it is absolutely key. I’m currently planning to run two 100 mile races 7 weeks apart in 2017. It all started with saying YES!

Read more about Graham's endurance races on his blog here.

 

 

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Tribe Stories Round Up – November 12th 2016

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Tribe Stories Round Up – November 12th 2016

A weekly (most of the time!) round-up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

 

Researched and written by Richard Potter

 


CHRIS WARD: BEST WAY ROUND

Best Way Round is a multi stage cycle trip round the world. Chris Ward will cycle around 1 continent every year for the next 6 years, spending three weeks on each continent. He starts on November 24th 2016 in Australia and will cycle from Adelaide to Brisbane. Not bad for someone with 4 kids and work to do: go Chris!

You can follow Chris’ progress on Facebook.

 


DAVE CORNTHWAITE: 1000 MILES ACROSS JAPAN BY SCOOTER

Next week Dave Cornthwaite will begin a 1000 mile journey across Japan on his scooter, Swifty. Setting off from Tokyo, Dave will travel in a wide loop through southern Honshu and Shikoku, visit Hiroshima and Mt Fuji then return to Tokyo just before Christmas.

You can learn more about Dave’s trip here and you can also follow his progress on Facebook.

 


KIKO MATTHEWS: THE TRANSATLANTIC SOLO 2018

Kiko Matthews, founder of SUPkiko, has started a campaign to become the fastest unsupported woman (and possibly person) to solo row the Atlantic. She’s raising money for Help for Heroes, Women in Sport and her own charity The Big Stand.

The Facebook page about her WR attempt is here.

Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We’d love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn’t need to be an endurance adventure, many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community. 


We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers. 

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

 

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Tribe Stories Round Up - November 4th 2016

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Tribe Stories Round Up - November 4th 2016

A weekly (most of the time!) round-up of stories, events and projects coming out of the YesTribe.

Researched and written by Richard Potter


theglasspassport.com-161023-105009.jpg

Yestival 2016

Yestival 2016 took place at Brinsbury Agricultural Centre, in West Sussex, on 21-23 October.

380 people camped in a gorgeous field in the depths of Autumn in a massive celebration of life and what it means to live it fully. The speakers entertained and inspired the attendees with tales of adventures great and small, as well as of the bumps in the road that we all have to deal with eventually.  There’s really nowhere else that you can do yoga  and Project Awesome in the morning, hear about great adventures from the past during the day and then connect with like-minded people to plan adventures for the future in the evening.

Just like last year, we’re thrilled, proud of and humbled by all the excitement, positive energy and commitment to change that Yestival inspired.  We won’t ask you to just take our word for it though: check out this blog post summarising one attendee’s Yestival experience and see professional photos of an incredible weekend.


Helen Proudfoot: Cycling to New Zealand

On the last day of Yestival, Helen Proudfoot set off on a cycle trip to New Zealand via various places including Europe, Bali and, slightly more unusually, Patagonia.

Helen is currently in La Rochelle: you can follow her progress on Facebook, visit her website and keep an eye out for her stickers (shown above) if you’re travelling abroad.


Graham Carter: The Autumn 100

On the 15th of October Graham Carter completed the Autumn 100, his second ever 100 mile race.  This was an amazing achievement given that Graham has suffered from shin/knee and hip issues in the past.

Check out Graham’s full race report here.


Laura Maisey: Running Home from Rome

In September Laura Maisey flew to Rome and starting running 1,249 miles back to London. So far she’s overcome a number of challenges, including nearly being locked in a nunnery.

Laura is fundraising for the Ronald McDonald House because of the way they’ve helped the son of a friend of hers.

You can read more about Laura’s story on her fundraising page and you can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter.


Sophie Rooney: Rundinavia

In August Sophie Rooney began a 3,630 km run across Scandinavia: once she finishes she’ll be the first woman to have completed the run. On the 2nd of November she passed the 2,500 km mark: go Sophie!

Sophie’s raising money for The Stroke Association, Mountain Rescue England & Wales and The Thomas Theyer Foundation. Her fundraising page is here and her Facebook page is here. You can also follow her on Twitter.

Have you been inspired by any of these stories? Do you have your own to share? We’d love to hear about it. The YesTribe is a community that is free to anyone who is looking to make life less restricted, more enjoyable, more interesting and more memorable. Your story doesn’t need to be an endurance adventure, many of the YesTribe are making films, raising money for good causes and developing the community. 


We’d love to hear from you, share your stories here at Say Yes More or join the Yes Tribe Facebook group to connect with fellow YesTribers. 

Make life memorable, Say Yes More!

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